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WHOLE WHEAT KALIBAL / कालीबाल

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Rs. 150.00
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Rs. 150.00
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Weight

Rich in proteins and gluten

Excellent for pasta and semolina.

WHOLE WHEAT KALIBAL / कालीबाल
WHOLE WHEAT KALIBAL / कालीबाल

Additional Product Details

Description

Kalibal, is a Durum wheat variety like Bansi, and was selected from domesticated hulled Emmer wheat. About 10 varieties of Durum wheat were documented in India in the first decade of the 20th century. They were extensively cultivated for rotis, flavour, nutrition and and yield as compared to white and soft bread wheat varieties.

Modern Durum wheat varieties lack the advantages of heirloom Durum wheat varieties since they have been bred to improve their baking properties; one of the most important being that gluten in modern varieties is more easily accessible than the older varieties. 

Older Durum wheat varieties like Kalibal are weak or less elastic due to poor gluten network, making them excellent for pasta and semolina.

Heirloom Kalibal is rich in proteins and gluten. However, due to its hard endosperm, gluten is not easily accessible from this heirloom variety.

OOO Farms provides the heirloom Kalibal wheat variety.

Health Benefits

Heirloom
Durum Wheat
Contains Less Complex Protein Structure
Easier to Digest
Rich in Protein
Rich in Gluten
Hard Endosperm

Recommended Usage

ROTI
PASTA
SEMOLINA UPMA

Commonly Known As

English: KALIBAL
Hindi: कालीबाल
Marathi: कालीबाल
Gujarati: કાલિબાલ
Tamil: கலிபால்
Telugu: కలిబాల్
Malayalam: കലിബാൽ
Kannada: ಕಲಿಬಾಲ್
Punjabi: ਕਾਲੀਬਾਲ
Bengali: কালীবাল

History

Kalibal, like other Durum wheat varieties like Bansi, was selected from domesticated hulled Emmer
wheat (one variety of which is Khapli). This was done 7500 to 6200 YBP in Eastern Mediterranean region. About 2500 YBP, Durum wheat varieties largely replaced Emmer wheat varieties

About 10 varieties of Durum wheat were documented in India in the first decade of the 20th century. They were extensively cultivated for rotis, flavour, nutrition and and yield as compared to white and soft bread wheat varieties. The hard Durum wheat varieties were not preferred by the British mills to whom the soft wheat varieties were sent.

Eventually, soft bread wheat varieties almost displaced Durum wheat varieties except for some exports to southern Mediterranean for macaroni.